New Geography

The Changing Geography of Asian Americans

The Changing Geography of Asian Americans

Over at New Geography Joel Kotkin and Wendell Cox have a piece about the changing residential patterns among Asian Americans and how those changes could affect the US economy: Asia is now the largest source of legal immigrants to the U.S., constituting 40% of new arrivals in 2013. They are the country’s highest-income, best-educated and fastest-growing […]

Read More →

Read More →

Your Town Might Be Able to Have an Arts Economy, Too

Your Town Might Be Able to Have an Arts Economy, Too

One of the criticisms of efforts to attract the so-called “creative class” is the tendency for the artists and bohemians that prepare the way for tech workers to accumulate in a few trendy places.  This limits the geographic reach of using arts development to foster other kinds of development.  However, in a recent post on […]

Read More →

Read More →

Which Metro. Areas Create Middle-Class Jobs?

Which Metro. Areas Create Middle-Class Jobs?

The folks at New Geography have been looking at this question.  Here’s what they came up with: . . . .There are eight metro areas that boast more mid-level jobs today than in 2007. The list is dominated by Texas cities, led by Austin-Round Rock-San Marcos. . . . . . . . Los Angeles-Long […]

Read More →

Read More →

America’s Innovation Hotspots:  “Engineering Hubs:”

America’s Innovation Hotspots: “Engineering Hubs:”

New Geography has a post ranking the best cities in the US for innovation.  In what should come as no surprise, the most innovative places have the highest concentrations of engineers: According to research from Houston Partnership economist Patrick Jankowski, there is a wide range of concentrations of engineering talent among the country’s 85 largest […]

Read More →

Read More →

Top